Haley’s Comet Is Making My Cat Creaky, and Other Observations

When health pieces come out that seem too weird to be right, they probably are.

The article (pulled in below for your reading pleasure) makes the point, and I’ll chat about it in this video. 

 

ARTICLE FROM WP:

Trying to lose weight? The colder months might be the perfect time.

Freezing temps are no excuse to give up on fitness. As it turns out, you might stand a better chance of losing weight when it’s cold.
A new study published in the journal Scientific Reports found that people actively trying to shed pounds had the best results when the temperature dropped. The more inhospitable the weather, the more conscientious people became about keeping track of their meals and calories.“Climate-related factors can directly change a person’s behavior, and these factors can have a certain impact on intentional efforts to lose weight,” said Sang Youl Rhee, who led the research team at Kyung Hee University Medical Center in Seoul. “In addition, various climatic factors can lead to a significant change in the level of energy expenditure in the body.”

Researchers tracked the weight loss of 3,274 people under 42 throughout Europe, the Americas and Asia with Noom Coach, a fitness app that can pinpoint the location of users. They then used a meteorology service, called Weather Underground API, to monitor conditions, and discovered that colder temperatures and lower dew points as well as higher wind speed and precipitation were all linked to the app users’ weight loss.

On average, people logged into Noom 110 days during the year-long study, or roughly every three days. Men tended to use the app more frequently than women and were more likely to lose weight. People who logged their meals regularly, especially dinner, lost the most weight.

 “During the weight-loss journey, it’s important to focus on changing the underlying behaviors that lead to obesity,” said Rhee, an endocrinologist. “Those who continue logging food and have an awareness around what they are eating will be most successful in losing weight.”

Chronicling meals, physical activity and weight have been proven in previous studies to be effective ways to lose weight. A Kaiser Permanente study of 1,700 people found that those who kept a daily account of what they ate lost twice as much weight as those who kept no record.

Noom, which launched in 2012, lets users choose from a variety of courses, ranging from 16 to 22 weeks, designed to prevent or manage chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Courses are created by physicians and come with a coach to guide users through the process. One week might be dedicated to understanding triggers to unhealthy foods you’re eating while another focuses on getting you to try a variety of veggies.

“It’s a cognitive behavior-based program, meaning you’re trying to understand what makes you have certain habits and behaviors and change your thinking around those behaviors and habits,” said Artem Petakov, president and co-founder of Noom. “There are different exercises to make you more mindful and more likely to problem-solve around those areas.”

Petakov said Noom has worked with other researchers, including a team at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, on wellness studies. In this case, the team at Kyung Hee approached the company, which has 45 million users worldwide, to get a diverse collection of anonymous data.

The study did not take exercise into account, but Petakov said that’s not necessarily a shortcoming.

“The popular notion is that physical activity is the key to achieving weight loss, but the truth is it’s more about nutrition,” Petakov said. “When it’s colder, you have more time to focus on the nutrition aspects, cooking more for example, and just have more time to dedicate to it without as many distractions as far as going outside.”

 

Which Milk Is Better For Kids? Get Ready To Have Your Mind Changed.

Low-fat milk may not be the best option for kids, though many experts recommend it to fight obesity for children over 2.

kids-milks-low-fat-chocolateCanadian researchers collected height and weight data on 2,745 healthy children ages 1 to 6 years. They took blood samples, and their parents reported how much skim, 1 percent, 2 percent and whole milk the children drank.

After controlling for age, sex, outdoor play and other factors that affect both vitamin D levels and weight, they found that children who drank one cup of whole milk per day had a vitamin D level comparable to that of children who drank 2.9 cups of 1 percent milk, but their body mass index was lower by 0.79 points. The higher the fat content of the milk they drank, the lower the children’s B.M.I. and the higher their vitamin D levels. The study is in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

“These two things together may make it a double whammy for low-fat milk,” he said. “But this is a small piece of the puzzle. We really need to do the research to answer these very basic questions.”

Why this happens is unknown, but the senior author, Dr. Jonathon L. Maguire, an associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Toronto, suggested that vitamin D is better absorbed with fat, and drinking low-fat milk may leave a child hungrier for more calorie-dense food.

Article source: NYTimes Well: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/22/well/eat/regular-milk-may-beat-low-fat-for-kids.html

Quick Video: The Best Foods Are Pedestrian Foods. But What Does That Even Mean?

The healthiest foods on Earth are the simple ones. You can look harder, you can look longer for the latest shiny nutritional distraction that purports some magical mystery tour to thinner thighs in thirty days or whatever, but the best foods for the best health have been there all along. They may be boring for our A.D.D. brains but they’re anything but boring for your body and mind.

No, You Can’t Prevent All Cancers

october-brease-cancer-awareness-eye-exam

My wife’s diagnosis taught me a lot about the disease

October, as you certainly know, is Breast Cancer awareness month. Football players are wearing pink, little ribbons show up on lapels, and a slew of articles will no doubt arise about preventing cancer. But like millions of people each year, my experience with this month is a bit more personal.

I know exactly where I was the moment my wife Dottie told me, “They got the results, Will. It’s cancer. Outside the duct. Invasive.” I lost my legs and the world collapsed in on itself like a scene from Inception. I sat there in the middle of a sidewalk outside Starbucks, lost to all else. As of today though, we are now on the other side of it and after 5 years of Tamoxifen, thank God are still cancer free.

The disorienting process made us both reprocess the things we thought we had known, particularly around the language we hear around cancer. Specifically, articles, videos, and entire websites proclaim that you can “prevent cancer.”

prevent-cancer-imageBut stating that you can prevent cancer leaves the impression that if you do contract this disease, then you didn’t do what it took to prevent it. It’s your fault. You should have, could have done more of something or less of something else. If you had just eaten more kale, did a few more laps, or followed through on those yoga classes, you could have prevented this from happening to you.

But the unfortunate truth is that you cannot prevent a lot of cancers or stop it, despite what the articles say: not by eating right, not by exercising, not by meditating. You just can’t.

How many anecdotes have you heard of people who were super healthy, doing everything exactly right (much like Dottie) and yet they still contracted the disease? Conversely, someone’s grandfather smoked all his life, was a junk food fiend, broke all the rules of health and still lived to the ridiculous age of 97. Living well no more prevents most cancer than living poorly causes it.

And this sounds like an enormous bummer, but makes an important point for those going through this wrenching process and those who fear they may: Even though you can’t turn it off or on with your behavior, you can change your risk probability. This may sound a bit academic, but the idea is quite simple. Think of it like playing dice, in which you have a certain chance of getting a good roll or bad roll. “Changing your risk probability” is like switching out the fair dice you were given with weighted dice.

To weight them in your favor, eat right, exercise, and control stress levels. Doing those things doesn’t mean they’ll always come up in your favor, only that you have better odds that they will. To weight them against you, eat poorly, be sedentary, smoke, binge drink. Doing those things won’t ensure you’ll land a terrible roll, only that it’s much more likely to happen.

This explains the chain smoking octogenarian junk food-a-holic, who may have tilted their risk profile very far against them, but still improbably managed to roll a Yahtzee in 6s. It also explains how you can lower your risk levels by perfectly healthy habits, and yet still roll the worst Yahtzee roll possible. Both of these can very easily happen, though odds are very small.

The most important piece of this is to not beat yourself up over the language suggesting you may have done something wrong. Dealing with the intense emotional and physical toll of the disease is plenty to manage without buying into the chatter that you could have prevented it in the first place.

Mediterranean Wellness at sea

Bringing the Mediterranean lifestyle back home.

The mistral is finally letting up enough for us to leave Santa Teresa, here on the northern most tip of Sardinia.

Only a few more days to go before I have to leave this beautiful place. I want to put it all in my carry-on bag and bring the lifestyle (and the food!!) back home.

The food?, I can reproduce that at home — somewhat, at least. But the lifestyle is tougher, once you step back into the Class 5 rapids of the American lifestyle.

I had a lunch yesterday with an Italian guy from Santa Teresa yesterday, and it lasted for over an hour and a half. We talked the whole time, and my plate of sea bass and potatoes (there were about 6 slices of potatoes on the plate) in a sauce of white wine and lemon and probably butter was not in a monster portion size, but it was incredibly satisfying.

I can make that fish at home (and I can't WAIT to make that fish at home), but it's tough to take the time you need to digest your food, to enjoy your food. Most of the time?, that 90 minute lunch just isn't going to happen.

So the only thing to actually do is to grab the moments when you can — with your kids, with your friends, with the people you love in your life — and connect with them in the few minutes that we do have.

Thats the best way i know of to bring something of this lifestyle back home. Oh yeah, and only eat incredible food 😉

Talk to you soon,
Will

Sent from my iPhone

Really Expensive Pee: Buyer Beware

Dietary Supplements (a.k.a., “really expensive pee”) are so commonly spiked with ingredients that aren’t even on the label, that the FDA has put them on notice. 

(please forward this to anyone who takes “really expensive pee”) Bookmark and Share 

Here’s the problem.
Over 300 cases of those supplements that you buy because you want to get all healthy, shopping in the, quote, health food store for pills that have skinny smiling people sitting in the lotus position beside a screen-shot of a water fall, sunset, Buddha or something … over 300 incidents of product adulteration have been flagged by the FDA.  
And those are the only ones they know about. 
Are these tainted pills bad for you? What do you think? The FDA has received reports on well over 100 products that have led to serious injuries, even deaths. The dead people never made it onto the packaging label. 
Listen To This
These tainted products can cause serious adverse effects, including strokes, organ failure and death,” said FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg. 
So the FDA is going to the 5 major trade associations that sell the expensive pee, to inform them that it is “their legal obligations and their responsibility to prevent tainted products from reaching the US market.”
The FDA’s own laboratory tests revealed a variety of undeclared active ingredients in products sold as dietary supplements like anticoagulants, drugs that prevent blood from clotting and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDS, that prevent inflammation and pain. They also found supplements that contained active drugs that had been taken off the market as a safety precaution.
The Bottom Line
Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, principal deputy commissioner, FDA says it’s buyer beware. “We want consumers to be aware that there are products masquerading as dietary supplements but pose significant dangers. Warning signs include products that claim to be alternatives to FDA approved drugs, products marketed primarily in a foreign language, marketed though mass E-mails, or sexual enhancers that boast rapid affects.”
Need a rule to follow? 
Pills are for sick people. Your best nutrition comes from your food. 

 For more information: Click here to visit Will Clower’s website.

Good News! FDA: It’s now safe to dump your Sweet-n-Low down the drain

Saccharine — the synthetic sweetener of Sweet-n-Low — has always been considered a potential carcinogen BUT, and I did not know this, also an environmental hazard!

(please share this with any who still consume synthetic sweeteners of any stripe)
 Bookmark and Share
Just recently, however, the “Calorie Control Council” petitioned the Environmental Protection Agency to reconsider their designation. The article below doesn’t go into detail to say WHY this synthetic is no longer considered to be a threat to our world, only that they’ve now deemed it safe to loose it into the environment. 


Whew!! Now you don’t have to treat saccharine products like your old paint cans, motor oil containers, and organic solvents, which have to be disposed of carefully because they’re STILL considered harmful to the environment.  


Nope. You don’t even need a haz-mat suit to throw away your Sweet-n-Low packets, now. You can just toss them into the first landfill, trash can, or dumpster you find.  

EPA says saccharin not a threat after all | Reuters
For more information: Click here to visit Will Clower’s website.

TV Interview: Healthy Holiday Foods

This week on KDKA-TV, I talk about the Reds and the Greens of the holiday season — what’s healthy, what’s not, and why!!

Sorry I couldn’t put the video here, but REAL Player is having an obstinant Teen-Moment and won’t load to my Blogger Account. Arg!!

Here is the link to my FB page where the video is: 

(please share this with someone who thinks red and green icing is its own food group!!)
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 For more information: Click here to visit Will Clower’s website.